matthew.dunch

Rev'd
Matthew
Dunch, SJ
DPhil Student
matthew.dunch's picture

Matthew is a Jesuit priest of the Midwest United States Province. He was born in York, Pennsylvania and raised in Youngstown, Ohio. He entered the Society of Jesus in 2006 after completing his undergraduate studies in philosophy at Catholic University in Washington, DC.

Matthew has a Master of Arts degree in philosophy from Loyola University Chicago, where he explored challenges to empathic understanding posed by radically divergent bodily conditions of interlocutors, particularly those caused by disability. He earned Master of Divinity and Master of Theology degrees (as well as their eccelsiastical analogs the Bachelor of Theology and License of Theology) at Regis College at the University of Toronto. His theological work focused on the relationship of mysticism and ethics.

He taught philosophy for three years at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. His teaching included courses in ethics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of religion. He also developed service learning ethics courses centered on homelessness and outsider art.

At Oxford Matthew’s D.Phil explores spiritual pedagogy. He is supervised by Professors Stephen Mulhall and Graham Ward.

Select Presentations:

Xavier University, Center for Missions and Identity,  Video presentations on the Ratio Studiorum, the Suppression of the Society of Jesus, and the Restoration of the Society of Jesus, 2014-2012

“Cultivating Virtues through Service Learning: An Ignatian Approach” Kuyers Institute: Vices, Virtues, and Teaching Conference, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI, 3 October 2013

Xavier University Philosophy and Film Lecture Series: “Krzysztof Kieślowski’s Decalogue V & Arendt’s Banality of Evil” and “Blade Runner & the Turing Test”

“The Pedagogy of Desire” Opening Lecture, Xavier University Year of Faith Lecture Series, "Education of Desire: the Gift of Ignatian Spirituality” October 2013

“Chrétien on Language and its Ends” The Catholic University of America, Graduate Philosophy Conference, March 2010